language and mind

August 3, 2012

Aristotle’s ‘latent mirth’

Filed under: books, language, psychology — teresapelka @ 11:14 am

Psychoanalysis has always amused me a little, Freud must have been a guy with peculiar problems. My recent today’s, actually discovery of a book ascribed to Rene Allendy has made psychoanalysis a real laugh. Imagine, Aristotle might have been a ‘son of an ancient barbarian spy’ and a ‘latent homosexual’ (!)

The book, the ‘Treason Complex’, does not show in Rene Allendy’s bibliographies. The available reprints would date back to 1949, seven years after Mr. Allendy’s death. The Internet is not an oracle, yet I’ll refer to the book as the “Complex”, without ascribing it to any author, and enclose my comments with my initials, TP.

TP: I never knew that got already worked out, the thing why people get born the places of their births and not other places, like a mile away. The “Complex” has the answer: ;)

Aristotle Born at Stagira. Why

One may wonder whether Nicomachus (Aristotle’s father, TP), the sovereign’s intimate friend, was not doing some kind of prospecting, or carrying out a secret mission in preparation for the conquest of that country.

TP: Just as any regular psychoanalyst produce, the “Complex” would have no explanation for the picture of the female nature it proposes.

That Nicomachus was on a pleasure trip is highly improbable. Even today the fact that spies spend their vacations in certain countries may be taken as a sure sign that secret diplomacy is going about its nefarious business there.

TP: Aristotle’s mother would have had to travel on a spying errand, herself in an advanced situation. Anything like this would have required some boundless attachment I do not believe in any possible evidence for in this human history entire, whatever brings the end of the world.

It is peculiar that Aristotle’s biographers, in their zeal to idealize their hero, should see in the fact of his birth on Greek soil an argument against his half-Greek origin. For them it is proof that he was “as purely Greek as Parmenides or Anaxagoras.” Actually, he was the son of a barbarian spy sent on a mission by his sovereign into a coveted Greek colony. He, himself, was to prove his barbarian background by working against Greece during his entire life.

TP: Stageira is about 34 miles away from Thessaloniki. Greek sources have Nicomachus, a native of Stageira, for a son of Machaon as well as a son of Asclepius the last-mentioned happening to most guys in the medical doings of those times to adopt Greek professional titles. The produce comments on Aristotle’s joining the Academy:

Generally speaking, a young boy who, for one reason or another, is deprived of his mother, as when he is sent to boarding school or becomes an orphan, to use the example given by Arthus, tends to transfer his affection to some other boy who will protect him and will show him some tenderness. He then becomes a homosexual and his desire is fixed on boys …

TP: Aristotle was not a little boy when he joined the Academy. He was about 18 years old. The inference on orphans does not deserve comment, as it is thought to merit discussion. Accordingly, I leave the below on their own.

We have no authority for supposing that a consummated relationship existed between Aristotle and Nicanor, but our psychological deductions lead to the belief …

… even if he had never approached another man sexually we could have inferred homosexual tendencies …

Aristotle’s writings are quite a challenge to psychoanalysis. This is the theme of my book project, ‘What Time Was It for Sigismund?’ :)

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