Feelings!

What do you do, if a child says — as children happen to be saying things — that he or she is hating you?
Do you say,
No, you are not hating me. You hate me.
It is a stative verb; here, have a list…?
😉

 

I have come across a few languages in my life, and English grammars and grammarians remain the only scholarly entities to recognize stative verbs.

 

Whatever order the British Council would enumerate on such special words to memorize, the couple in the picture do not look like rehearsing rote.

 

PICTURE: A YOUNG COUPLE

 

In fact, it feels quite strange to be told to parrot words as from a list, especially for thought and emotion. It feels… a kind of lie.

 

If you want to do something, your ambition should be to do it good, and good liars do not publicize their lying rules. 😉

 

The ruling at stake here is that we should not use “stative verbs” with the Progressive.

 

Let us take the verb to feel, for quite the interesting example it makes. We might say, “I feel fresh”, to speak about our senses. We could say, “I feel love”, to speak about our emotions. We also could say, possibly in another context, “I feel this is crude”, to say what we think.

 

It is only in the last sense we would remain with the verb to feel — as definitely as only mostly, still — in the Simple shape for lively talking about a moment in time.

 

The verb to love is another prominent form in “stative verb” scopes. Let us compare American English at work.

 

This is a dream come true. And I’m loving every minute of it.
(NBC Today Sun as in the Corpus of Contemporary American English, COCA.)

 

I’ve been loving it. But I want to keep doing different things.
(People magazine as in COCA.)

 

Whether the English is American or British, we cannot resolve to have the Simple and Progressive merely for options, and try to operate from memory, on words not to use with the Progressive.
I’m loving you,
is not the same as saying
I don’t love you.

 

Feel welcome to the
GRAMMAR WEB LOG: TIME IN THE MIND AND HEART.

*****

LINK: READ THIS IN A SLAVIC LANGUAGE, POLISH

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