Index, Nature

POL

Notes for Emily Dickinson’s poetry | Fascicles and print; the poetic correlative with Webster 1828 and other literary devices, Latin and Greek inspiration, an Aristotelian theme. More→

(1) I. New Feet within My Garden Go
New fingers stir the sod;
A troubadour upon the elm
Betrays the solitude. More→

(2) II. May-Flower
Pink, small, and punctual,
Aromatic, low,
Covert in April,
Candid in May,
Dear to the moss,
Known by the knoll… More→

(3) III. Why?
The murmur of a bee
A witchcraft yieldeth me.
If any ask me why,
’T were easier to die
Than tell. More→

(4) IV. Perhaps You’d Like to Buy a Flower
Perhaps you’d like to buy a flower?
But I could never sell.
If you would like to borrow
Until the daffodil
Unties her yellow bonnet… More→

(5) V. The Pedigree of Honey
The pedigree of honey
Does not concern the bee… More→

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If her skill was taken for supernatural, the world may never have seen her original handwriting. Feel welcome to Poems by Emily Dickinson prepared for print by Teresa Pelka: thematic stanzas, notes on the Greek and Latin inspiration, the correlative with Webster 1828, and the Aristotelian motif, “Things perpetual — these are not in time, but in eternity”.
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(6) VI. A Service of Song
Some keep the Sabbath going to church;
I keep it staying at home,
With a bobolink for a chorister,
And an orchard for a dome. More→

(7) VII. The Bee Is Not Afraid of Me
I know the butterfly;
The pretty people in the woods
Receive me cordially. More→

(8) VIII. Summer’s Armies
Some rainbow coming from the fair!
Some vision of the world Cashmere
I confidently see!

Or else, a peacock’s purple train,
Feather by feather, on the plain
Fritters itself away!

The dreamy butterflies bestir,
Lethargic pools resume the whir
Of last year’s sundered tune.

From some old fortress on the sun
Baronial bees march, one by one,
In murmuring platoon! More→

(9) IX. The Grass
The grass so little has to do —
A sphere of simple green,
With only butterflies to brood,
And bees to entertain;

And stir all day to pretty tunes
The breezes fetch along,
And hold the sunshine in its lap
And bow to everything… More→

(10) X. A Little Road Not Made of Man
A little road not made of man,
Enabled of the eye,
Accessible to thill of bee,
Or cart of butterfly. More→

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The enclosed criterion embraces the epsilon, predicate structure, vowel contour, phonemics, person reference in abstract thought, and altogether stylistic coherence. The result supports doubt on fascicle originality. There always is the simple question as well: do we believe Emily Dickinson tried to tell about very exceptional Bees, Ears, or Birds, so peculiar that you write them with capital letters?
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(11) XI. Summer Shower
A drop fell on the apple tree,
Another on the roof;
A half a dozen kissed the eaves,
And made the gables laugh.

A few went out to help the brook,
That went to help the sea.
Myself conjectured, Were they pearls,
What necklaces could be! More→

(12) XII. Psalm of The Day
A something in a summer’s day,
As slow her flambeaux burn away,
Which solemnizes me;

A something in a summer’s noon —
An azure depth, a wordless tune,
Transcending ecstasy;

And still within a summer’s night
A something so transporting bright,
I clap my hands to see;

Then veil my too inspecting face,
Lest such a subtle, shimmering grace
Flutter too far for me. More→

(13) XIII. The Sea of Sunset
This is the land the sunset washes,
These are the banks of the Yellow Sea;
Where it rose, or whither it rushes,
These are the western mystery! More→

(14) XIV. Purple Clover
There is a flower that bees prefer,
And butterflies desire;
To gain the purple democrat
The humming-birds aspire;
And whatsoever insect pass,
A honey bears away
Proportioned to his several dearth
And her capacity. More→

(15) XV. The Bee
Like trains of cars on tracks of plush
I hear the level bee:
A jar across the flowers goes,
Their velvet masonry
Withstands until the sweet assault
Their chivalry consumes,
While he, victorious, tilts away
To vanquish other blooms. More→

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Poetry by Emily Dickinson:
Life | Love | Nature | Time and Eternity.

Notes for Emily Dickinson’s poetry | Fascicles and print, the poetic correlative with Webster 1828, Latin and Greek inspiration, an Aristotelian motif, Things perpetual — these are not in time, but in eternity. More→
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(16) XVI. Presentiment
Presentiment is that long shadow on the lawn
Indicative that suns go down… More→

(17) XVII. As Children Bid the Guest Goodnight
As children bid the guest good-night,
And then reluctant turn,
My flowers raise their pretty lips,
Then put their nightgowns on. More→

(18) XVIII. Angels in the Early Morning
Angels, in the early morning,
May be seen the dews among;
Stooping, plucking, smiling, flying:
Do the buds to them belong? More→

(19) XIX. So Bashful When I Spied Her
So bashful, when I spied her,
So pretty, so ashamed!
So hidden in her leaflets,
Lest anybody find… More→

(20) XX. Two Worlds
It makes no difference abroad —
The seasons fit the same,
The mornings blossom into noons,
And split their pods of flame. More→

* * * * *
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* * * * *

(21) XXI. The Mountain
The mountain sat upon the plain
In his eternal chair,
His observation omnifold,
His inquest everywhere. More→

(22) XXII. A Day
I’ll tell you how the sun rose —
A ribbon at a time!
The steeples swam in amethyst,
The news like squirrels ran!
The hills untied their bonnets,
The bobolinks begun;
Then I said softly to myself,
“That must have been the sun!” More→

(23) XXIII. The Butterfly’s Assumption-Gown
The butterfly’s assumption-gown,
In chrysoprase apartments hung,
This afternoon put on. More→

(24) XXIV. The Wind
Of all the sounds despatched abroad,
There ’s not a charge to me
Like that old measure in the boughs,
That phraseless melody
The wind does, working like a hand
Whose fingers brush the sky,
Then quiver down, with tufts of tune
Permitted gods and me. More→

(25) XXV. Death and Life
Apparently with no surprise
To any happy flower,
The frost beheads it at its play
In accidental power. More→

* * * * *

Poetry by Emily Dickinson:
Life | Love | Nature | Time and Eternity.

Notes for Emily Dickinson’s poetry | Fascicles and print, the poetic correlative with Webster 1828, Latin and Greek inspiration, an Aristotelian motif, Things perpetual — these are not in time, but in eternity. More→
* * * * *

(26) XXVI. ’T Was Later When the Summer Went
’T was later, when the summer went
Than when the cricket came,
And yet we knew that gentle clock
Meant nought but going home. More→

(27) XXVII. Indian Summer
These are the days when birds come back,
A very few, a bird or two,
To take a backward look.

These are the days when skies put on
The old, old sophistries of June, —
A blue and gold mistake. More→

(28) XXVIII. Autumn
The morns are meeker than they were,
The nuts are getting brown;
The berry’s cheek is plumper,
The rose is out of town. More→

(29) XXIX. Beclouded
The sky is low, the clouds are mean,
A travelling flake of snow
Across a barn or through a rut
Debates, if it will go. More→

(30) XXX. The Hemlock
I think the hemlock likes to stand
Upon a marge of snow;
It suits his own austerity,
And satisfies an awe
That men must slake in wilderness,
Or in the desert cloy —
An instinct for the hoar, the bald,
Lapland’s necessity. More→

(31) XXXI. There’s a Certain Slant of Light
There’s a certain slant of light,
On winter afternoons,
That oppresses, like the weight
Of cathedral tunes.

Heavenly hurt it gives us;
We can find no scar,
But internal difference
Where the meanings are. More→

* * * * *
If her skill was taken for supernatural, the world may never have seen her original handwriting. Feel welcome to Poems by Emily Dickinson prepared for print by Teresa Pelka: thematic stanzas, notes on the Greek and Latin inspiration, the correlative with Webster 1828, and the Aristotelian motif, “Things perpetual — these are not in time, but in eternity”.
Electronic format $2.99
E-book | NOOK Book | Kindle
Soft cover, 260 pages, $16.89
Amazon | Barnes & Noble
Hard cover, 260 pages, $21.91
Barnes & Noble | Lulu, full preview

The enclosed piece-by-piece analysis works a criterion to embrace the epsilon, predicate structure, vowel contour, phonemics, person reference in abstract thought, and altogether stylistic coherence. The result supports doubt on fascicle originality. There always is the simple question as well: do we believe Emily Dickinson tried to tell about very exceptional Bees, Ears, or Birds, so peculiar that you write them with capital letters?
* * * * *