Wycliffe Gloss, Acumblid, aclumsid: inept

We have heard the laud for them, and inept have been our hands, tribulation has taken us, we are sore as the one laboring with a child.

Jeremiah, 6:24
■→Wycliffe volume 3, page 358

Early Version

We han herd the loes of it, losid atwynne ben oure hondus ; tribulacioun caʒte vs, sorewis as the trauailende with childe.

Later Version

We herden the fame therof, oure hondis ben ‘aclumsid; tribulacioun hath take vs as a womman trauelinge of child.

Wycliffe forms and reference

p.p. aclumsid, Jeremiah 6:24, Ezekiel 21:7;
p.p. acumblid, Jeremiah 6:24,
■→Stratmann, page 31


A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Modern English

Modern form: ■→clumsy

Modern senses: awkward, inept, maladroit.

Synonyms

■→gauche
■→gawky
■→hefty
■→hick
■→ill-chosen
■→Moby Thesaurus

Etymology

Old English a-cumlen, to become cramped.


A D V E R T I S E M E N T

The world may never have seen her original handwriting, if her skill was taken for supernatural. Feel welcome to Poems by Emily Dickinson prepared for print by Teresa Pelka: thematic stanzas, notes on the Greek and Latin inspiration, the correlative with Webster 1828, and the Aristotelian motif, Things perpetual — these are not in time, but in eternity.

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