Agrisen: shudder at

Image by Robin Higgins from Pixabay

POL

My wife shuddered at my breath, and I prayed for the sons of my lap.

Job, 19:17
Wycliffe volume 2, page 699

Early Version
My wif agriside my breth; and I preʒede the sones of my wombe.

Later Version
My wijf wlatide my breeth; and Y preiede the sones of my wombe.


Etymology
Old English āgrīsan; a related modern form grisly.

Modern senses: to shudder at, to turn away from.

Note
Modern womb is derived from Old English wamb; Old High German wamba, a tender part, lower abdomen as different from the stomach; today: the lap, embrace; Wiktionary.

The Greek myth of Cronus elaborated also on the abdomen and vocabulary differences between eating or care.



A D V E R T I S E M E N T

The world may never have seen her original handwriting, if her skill was taken for supernatural. Feel welcome to Poems by Emily Dickinson prepared for print by Teresa Pelka: thematic stanzas, notes on the Greek and Latin inspiration, the correlative with Webster 1828, and the Aristotelian motif, Things perpetual — these are not in time, but in eternity.

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