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Cognitive variables in grammar

Our human minds have a natural habit to associate time and place. Without exception, the two co-occur in our earthly reality: we cannot have time without place, or place without time. Computer virtual projects might isolate the two, but human grammar has not evolved in a virtual reality.

 

Let us think about a few basic words we might use to talk about places. The words could be on, in, and to: we people live on Earth, we give at least psychological borders to areas in which we are, and we learn as well as remember ways to places.

 

We people also map cognitively. Our cognitive maps do not have the strict geographical measurement, but they partake in the ability to get to a place in the shortest length of space as well as time, in our everyday routes, to school, work, or another location.

 

Let us think about the grammatical Aspects most children acquire before school tuition begins: the Simple, the Progressive, and the Perfect.

 

The Simple: We often use it to speak about habits, as well as feelings and thoughts — all that does not change often. We may have the habit to do something usually, as well as… never. We can think about a cognitive map. The Simple would tell what we generally see that existed, exists, or we think will exist ON the map.

 

The Progressive: We can use it to say that something was, is, or will be IN progress, IN its course. To imagine this Aspect, we could picture activity or faculties in an area.

 

The Perfect: we can use it to say what had taken place, has taken place, or will have taken place TO a moment in time. The moment does not have to mark the end of the state, activity, or faculty work. We may view the course or occurrence of the activity as a way to a place.

 

As our grammars cannot depend on particular geographical areas, we may think about an abstract cognitive extent that would work for us wherever we are.

 

 

Let us compare classic grammar guidance. We may learn we use the Present Progressive for things happening “now”. We might get to associate the tense with the word “now”, but such a rule would not work any time we speak about the way we feel or think. We yet say,

I am happy now,
I think I like it now
(Present Simple).

 

With variables, we may think about granting or denying cognitive extents. For example, if we select part an extent for our view, we mark we do not mean an entire extent:

 

He is being mad {IN}. He is sane {ON}.

 

Feel welcome to comment as well as see more at

Chapter 4. Time rambles different with different people

 

The conscious mind of Emily Dickinson

There is an occurrence in Emily Dickinson’s verse; it is beyond mere coincidence or unaware habit. Noticed, it helps see her light musing with Greek and Latin.

 

(Time and Eternity, XVIII, Playmates) Latin: collusor, companion at play; condiscipulus, school-mate; angelus, a messenger, an angel; lapillus, small stone, pebble (marble?); lusus, a game;  Greek: ὁμηλυσία, omelusia, companionship.

 

God permits industrious angels
Afternoons to play.
I met one, — forgot my school-mates,
All, for him, straightway.

 

God calls home the angels promptly
At the setting sun;
I missed mine. How dreary marbles,
After playing Crown!

 

The inspiration is morpho-phonemic. Let us try a few more pieces. (Life, XXIII, Unreturning) ἀνάπλυσις, anaplusis, washing or rinsing out; ἀνήλυσις, anelusis, going up, return; ἤλυσις, elusis, step, gait; lenunculus, a small sailing-vessel, bark, skiff (the toddling little boat).

 

‘T was such a little, little boat
That toddled down the bay!
‘T was such a gallant, gallant sea
That beckoned it away!

 

‘T was such a greedy, greedy wave
That licked it from the coast;
Nor ever guessed the stately sails
My little craft was lost!

 

We can compare the Greek -upo/ypo- for I asked no other thing (Life, XII, p. 213): ἰσότυπος, isotypos, shaped alike, συνυπόπτωσις, synypoptosis, simultaneous presentation to the senses; Latin cauponarius, a male shopkeeper, tradesman, ποπτερνίς, upopternis, a knob (a kind of a button that can twirl, in the modern use), and πo, below, looking a picture up and down (as Brazil on a map).

 

I asked no other thing,
No other was denied.
I offered Being for it;
The mighty merchant smiled.

 

Brazil? He twirled a button,
Without a glance my way:
“But, madam, is there nothing else
That we can show to-day?”

 

Feel also welcome to read Why I stay with the first print.