grammar

Cognitive variables in grammar

Our human minds have a natural habit to associate time and place. Without exception, the two co-occur in our earthly reality: we cannot have time without place, or place without time. Computer virtual projects might isolate the two, but human grammar has not evolved in a virtual reality.

 

Let us think about a few basic words we might use to talk about places. The words could be on, in, and to: we people live on Earth, we give at least psychological borders to areas in which we are, and we learn as well as remember ways to places.

 

We people also map cognitively. Our cognitive maps do not have the strict geographical measurement, but they partake in the ability to get to a place in the shortest length of space as well as time, in our everyday routes, to school, work, or another location.

 

Let us think about the grammatical Aspects most children acquire before school tuition begins: the Simple, the Progressive, and the Perfect.

 

The Simple: We often use it to speak about habits, as well as feelings and thoughts — all that does not change often. We may have the habit to do something usually, as well as… never. We can think about a cognitive map. The Simple would tell what we generally see that existed, exists, or we think will exist ON the map.

 

The Progressive: We can use it to say that something was, is, or will be IN progress, IN its course. To imagine this Aspect, we could picture activity or faculties in an area.

 

The Perfect: we can use it to say what had taken place, has taken place, or will have taken place TO a moment in time. The moment does not have to mark the end of the state, activity, or faculty work. We may view the course or occurrence of the activity as a way to a place.

 

As our grammars cannot depend on particular geographical areas, we may think about an abstract cognitive extent that would work for us wherever we are.

 

 

Let us compare classic grammar guidance. We may learn we use the Present Progressive for things happening “now”. We might get to associate the tense with the word “now”, but such a rule would not work any time we speak about the way we feel or think. We yet say,

I am happy now,
I think I like it now
(Present Simple).

 

With variables, we may think about granting or denying cognitive extents. For example, if we select part an extent for our view, we mark we do not mean an entire extent:

 

He is being mad {IN}. He is sane {ON}.

 

Feel welcome to comment as well as see more at

Chapter 4. Time rambles different with different people

 

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British grammar nazis

Disclaimer: the adjacent — and colored meaningfully yellow — graphic piffle is not intended to mean the Union Jack proper. It is the British grammar nazis logo on Facebook.

 

Grammer

 

The logo dubious pulchritude may be seen in its full down here, also with a click.

 

British grammar nazis header

 

Let me lay out on the fundamentals of orthography. I do not spell the nazis with a big letter. Big letters, though they do not always import reverence, are reserved for proper nouns, everywhere except a beginning.

 

The proper noun Nazis were German nationalists. Their having bombed London during WWII might belong with the semantic field too, and further reasonably connote displeasure on the part of the British people. I mean, I do not have other people’s feelings, but thus I do reckon.

 

Much has been written about the second world war, including Hitler’s evident lack of linguistic finesse. Therefore, I will do some wondering only, on the British who want to be grammar nazis.

 

The Daily Mash offers observations.

 

“The way they selflessly dedicate themselves to correct punctuation, for example by pointing out to the staff of a chip shop why the term >>chip’s<< is a sloppy obfuscation, confirms they are bold and righteous individuals.”

 

 

On Facebook, grammar nazis share the article and comment.
“This pleases me. A lot!”
“We are doing a service to the world in helping people be rid of their ignorance!”
“We knew it all the time!”

 

It is only after a few lines or whiles that thought emerges.
“I suspect someone is taking the p*ss.”

 

 

Grammar nazis do not get irony. Let me think about statistics and implications. Should there be visiting nazis on this page, I promise a brief primer on irony after this indispensable piece of advice about living on the same planet.

 

The site has about 50 thousand “likes”. Taking the British population alone, that would make about 50 thousand oddly deficient, among about 63 million people.

 

Some might say it is not so bad. It is not even one percent. Still, it could be better to think literacy, going to England: the guys are permitted to have the UK flag for their capriccio, and odd types favor big towns, as London.

 

However this could not mean there only odd types in big towns, before you go to London, try for a plain passport photo, that is, without brooches, scarves, ties, anything you do not always carry. The piffle shows the guys’ attention to picture specifics. 😉

 

Wave your hand broadly, getting a taxi. It is a simple, therefore legible gesture. Get a map with statues and other tourist attractions in large icons. It is better to take a walk from the National Museum than end up the Piccadilly, owing to small print. 😉

 

In hotels, always tick the boxes. Ask for those straight, should you be provided with a form without boxes to tick. 😉

 

Mailing letters, get the recorded. They have ID strips. Seeking directions, approach people with newspapers. They could be literate. However, never ever leave your books or papers open and unattended. They might be taken for other utilities. 😉

 

Now, the primer on irony. The basics are in the affirmative and the negative. You do not take them for a yes or no merely. Let me quote the Mash:

 

“In no way are any of these people vain, arsey pedants.”

 

This does not have to mean a refutation, as Wikipedia explains. Life cannot be about affirming or denying only. Let me return to the Mash.

 

“The way they selflessly dedicate themselves to correct punctuation, for example by pointing out to the staff of a chip shop why the term >>chip’s<< is a sloppy obfuscation, confirms they are bold and righteous individuals."

 

Antonyms and synonyms are the answer.

 

Laying all out in detail to a grammar nazi looks discouragingly big a task, hence the handful of thoughts and the primary color, yellow (adjective, reference 3).

 

Grammar nazis do not offer own blogs or websites, especially with serious language work, for evaluation. Their picking on people’s works has no chance to bring anything creative, sophisticated. My attitude to them as well as critics will remain the same: Where is your own, better stuff?