3. The role of feedback in language use

The human brain remains of reference for feedback processes in language use, since neither linguistic competence nor linguistic performance are mere abstract entities but are mediated by the physical structure of the human brain (Puppel, 1992). Program and feedback to be compared for neuro-behavioral priority in self-preservation, universalist tendencies in linguistics are analyzed with concern … Continue reading 3. The role of feedback in language use

2. The role of feedback in language learning

Regard to natural language acquisition and learning motivates a psychological meaning for feedback competence, described as the knowledge of the results of any behavior, considered as influencing or modifying further performance (Webster’s Encyclopedic Dictionary of the English Language, 1989). Knowledge can be defined as information gained via experience or study, the information processing framework is … Continue reading 2. The role of feedback in language learning

Introduction

Human language processing can be viewed as human processing of information, where terms as a system, program, and option, though correlative with computer science, are not to imply close a correspondence, since natural language remains a scope of skill unmatched by artificial parsing. Human neurophysiology is the primary reference for the following discourse on the role of feedback in human language command. More→


1. Neurophysiology of feedback

1.1. Feedback in the single neuron; 1.2. Space and time in neural communication; 1.3. Human systemic dynamics; 1.4. A reflex arc; 1.5. Human reflex and voluntary behavior; 1.6. Relevant neuro-motor patterns; 1.7. Sensory compensation; 1.8. The pool model for internal balance; 1.9. Signal specificity and the human brain. More→


FAQ: Generative & Universal Grammar

Are there actually Language Acquisition Devices in human brains and can brains be programmed? Could language be a result of genetic mutation? Is there one decisive or definitive grammar we could call "the true grammar" that is complete or irrefutable, in terms of principles or neural models? More→